Saturday, March 29, 2003

BRITISH MATH?

Who can tell me what's wrong with this story?
AFTER WATCHING FOX NEWS LAST NIGHT . . .

I'm curious as to all y'all's thoughts: Who's more likely to have an on-air full-body aneurysm: Dan Rather or Sheppard Smith? Looking forward to your comments.
YESTERDAY THEY SAID IT WAS 196 CRUISE MISSILES. . .

Embedded in this report, a spokesman from the Iraqi military provides a list of what they've knocked out of the skies so far:

He said Iraqi forces have shot down 143 cruise missiles, five warplanes, four helicopters, six pilotless aircraft and captured one Apache attack helicopter. Iraqi forces destroyed dozens of tanks and other vehicles, he said.
IF YOU THINK WE CAN'T FIGHT LIKE THE IRAQIS . . .

. . . you'd better go read this.
SINISSIPPI UPDATE

Overnight the ice went off the lake. It's good to look at clear, moving water again.

Friday, March 28, 2003

'THIS LAND IS OURS AND ALWAYS WILL BE'

In case you're wondering about how Native Americans might be viewing the war, here's a columnist's take from the Grand Forks (ND) Herald.
TO BE AN EX-STAR, FIRST YOU HAVE TO BE A STAR, I GUESS

TV tonight featured a couple of 80s icons: C. Thomas Howell on Pax in a "killer bee" movie (which was definitely no better than a B-movie) and Michael Gross (you know, the dad from Family Ties) in "Tremors: The Series" on the Sci-Fi Channel.

Me, I'm still holding out for the Meeno Peluce Film Festival.
LIKE MUSHROOMS AFTER THE RAIN

The Daily Nebraskan (via Yahoo) tells of Nebraska's crop of no-name I-backs and their exploits during spring football.

NU still has 'I-backs' and 'rush ends.' Do they know the drop kick has been outlawed?
PINEAPPLE SODA: THE VERDICT

Not bad, a little sweet for my taste, though. Pineapple juice is still infinitely better.
BACK TO NORMAL

Paula and Hailee are back from Florida safe and sound. My wife knows me well. Rather than bringing back some mouse-infested souvenir, she brought back two bottles of Fanta pineapple soda. I'll let you know how it is after I've tasted it, but since there's few pineapple-flavored anythings that I don't like, expect a glowing review!
MORE ON 'JUST WAR' THEOLOGY

. . . for the none of you who care, I'm sure. This comes from Donald Sensing's 'One Hand Clapping' blog, and it's a must-read about how church hierarchy continues to manifest a divide between pew and pulpit.

You should read Sensing's blog often; it's excellent.
FOR ONCE, THE BENGALS AREN'T #1 ON A 'WORST OF THE NFL' LIST

One sportswriter's take on what NFL teams are messing themselves up the most in free agency. The Cardinals are #1, and the Bengals . . . well, they made the list.

But who's surprised by that?
THINGS ARE TOUGH ALL OVER

From Yahoo, proof that clergy sexual abuse isn't just an American problem.
THE KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THIS ONE: 'TOWN OF 40'

The mayor of the town of Mount Sterling, Iowa wants to ban lying. Good luck, Your Honor. But how will you campaign for re-election?
SOMETIMES I THINK HE IS ME

Definitely go read James Lileks' latest Daily Bleat. Not only does he largely echo what I think about media coverage, but . . . his wife and kids are also out of town right now . . . and he's been spending too much time revamping his MP3s. One significant difference, though: I wouldn't listen to Golden Earring's "Twilight Zone" except maybe on a bet. But that's tough talk from a guy who's got as many Survivor MP3s as I do.
THIS IS IT!

Light blogging today. Paula et al. made it as far as Louisville last night and are expecting to get back here around 2ish. But it's cold and rainy today, so I'm guessing it will actually be 3ish. Ne'ertheless, I've got to remedy this place from its eight days of bachelorhood. I've got the dishes done, but there's still some picking up to do. There are a couple of interesting links I want to catalog, though, so stay tuned.

Thursday, March 27, 2003

SUBMITTED WITHOUT MUCH COMMENT

It's been pretty obvious for years that Robert Blake dyed his hair, but what's with his lawyer? I wasn't aware the Robert James Waller look had caught on among Hollywood defense attorneys . . .
SCARS THAT NEVER HEAL

The AP reports on flashbacks being suffered by combat vets during this media-intensive war.

I can only imagine. I threw my congregation's vets a big Valentine in this month's newsletter, and I included a passage about how I knew some of them brought back war souvenirs they'd just as soon left behind. Just another reason why nobody's really "pro-war;" there are just some of us who think some fights are necessary.

Note that I said some. Like I said a zillion posts ago, I'm only reluctantly in favor of this one.
SIGNS OF CHANGE

News24, the excellent South African news site, has finally come to a conclusion: the national cricket team is more important than the war in Iraq. Click the link now to see their lead story, before something big happens and they're forced to change it.
THE REAL QUAGMIRE'S IN THE TWIN CITIES

When I first moved to Minnesota 11 years ago, there was much discussion, angst, and hand-wringing over the future of the Twins and the Vikings, particularly if they didn't get new stadiums soon.

When I left 'Sota in '98, nothing had been resolved.

Five years later, there's still no new stadium, and no real plan for one.

The state's finally decided to take some sort of action, at least: they're making the stadium commission a statewide entity.

Great. Look for the Twins' new stadium to be built on a vacant lot in downtown Fulda sometime in 2016.
. . . OR ELSE IT ONLY APPLIES IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE, I GUESS

Courtesy of InstaPundit.com, here's a link to another person's thoughts on liberation theology and whether it can be used to justify this war. The article doesn't quite come to a conclusion, but it at least strongly implies that the Catholic Church has sought to distance itself somewhat from "liberation theology." One may safely assume the Curia has sought to distance itself completely from it, at least in this present case.
SHOUT-OUT

I haven't figured out how to add a "blogroll" to this thing yet, so I'll just provide a link to Chris Boyd's blog, since he was kind enough to link to me on his page. Thanks Chris! But K-State is still doomed this year . . .
WE'RE NOW PARTICIPATORY!

Comments have been enabled. Keep 'em no worse than PG or they'll be un-enabled.
MORE MEDIA BASHING IN . . . uhh . . . THE MEDIA

Here's a piece from Slate about "the wartime news cycle" and how this war is, so far, going exactly according to plan. This is the "money quote" from the article, IMO:

"Unconventional warfare turns out to be unconventional for a reason: It is a superb form of suicide."
"HUMANITARIANISM" AT WORK

Buried deep within this BBC report about the looming humanitarian crisis (crises?) in southern Iraq is this little joy-gram:

"Several aid agencies say they are unwilling to send in lorries escorted by US-led forces, for fear this will destroy their impartiality and neutrality in the conflict."

Riiiiight. You're going to alleviate suffering by prolonging it because you don't want anybody to think you're in favor of the war? Congratulations. You've just politicized food distribution. It's a good thing the Beeb isn't naming names, or there might be a long list of donors asking for their money back.
WHO'S THE LESSER OF THESE TWO EVILS?

While many Americans are mightily peeved at French president Jacques Chirac, it's interesting to note who he faced in the last French election. Think Pat Buchanan, only a little more so. Jean-Marie Le Pen may have lost the election, but it appears he managed to tap a hidden vein of French nationalism--and made Chirac a captive to it.
ATLANTA STRIKES AGAIN

Paula reports having gotten lost in heavy Atlanta traffic (is there any other kind?) last night on her way to a friend's house in north Georgia. She also mentions it's beautiful in GA today. It certainly isn't here. The wind is howling and, while there was a little sunshine earlier, it's gone now and it looks like this place could go Seattle any minute.

All in all, a perfect day for staying in.
YES, BUT IT WAS AN OBVIOUS TARGET

A little good-natured media bashing courtesy of Canada's National Post yields this howler, referring to Dan Rather:

"I highly recommend CBS to anyone who wants to watch both a war and a man going slowly insane on national television."
ONE PERSPECTIVE YOU'RE NOT HEARING FROM CHURCH LEADERS

From the BuzzMachine blog comes this account of whether the "liberation theology" that was all the rage during the 60s, 70s, and 80s (and still persists in some theological backwaters) justifies war in Iraq.

Liberation theology was the darling of left-leaning religious types when it was an effective tool to lay guilt on the wealthy, or could otherwise be used to incite class-based ideological warfare. But what about when it might actually justify live-fire? Which is worse, war or oppression?
HE REALLY IS THE HITLER OF BAGHDAD

A South African website reports Saddam Hussein has made plans to avoid being captured alive. I'd say, in his case, that's a good idea. However, I think it's a little too late for him to be seeking exile now.
E.T. DROPS IN FOR AN ITALIAN BEEF

A meteorite strikes in suburban Chicago. No word yet from Grovers Corners, NJ.
THERE'S A SITE FOR EVERYTHING, IT SEEMS

Try this one on: a page reviewing every recipe for tater tot casserole available on the Internet. Your humble correspondent is speechless, still remembering the TTC he was served in the grade-school cafeteria.
THEN AGAIN, YOU'VE PROBABLY HEARD THEM ALREADY

From NetFunny.com, a few jokes about the war in Iraq.
OPEN WINDOW UPDATE

Brrrrr. It must be about six degrees in here this morning. A hot cup of coffee sure feels good in my hands.

Wednesday, March 26, 2003

SLEEPING WITH THE WINDOWS OPEN

Spring hasn't fully sprung yet. It's down to about 35 degrees outside tonight, under a mottled, Goodwillish blanket of cumulus clouds. The ice on the lake hasn't made any significant advances or retreats.

Paula gets back sometime on Friday. I'm taking advantage of her absence to do something I just can't do when she's here--sleep in a cold bedroom. I've got both windows open about 5 inches, and there's a nice, cold breeze flowing in between them. In fact, I'm losing feeling in my toes as I write this.

Over on the bed there's a largish pile of pillows and two thick, warm comforters. I plan to dig under them soon and sleep like a king.

See you tomorrow.
OUTFLANKING STRATEGY?

According to the Village Voice, the Bush administration may use the cover of war to expand the power of the Patriot Act. The theory is that, in a time of war, Congresspeople will be loath to seem against national security by opposing a huge expansion of Federal powers.

My take: Watch what happens as a clue to how this war is really going. If you don't hear that the administration wants to expand the Patriot Act, that's a sign that the war isn't going as well as we're led to believe. After all, this strategy only works if there's a substantial political risk to being against the administration's war plan. If Iraq turns into a new Vietnam, there won't be much enthusiasm for giving the executive branch more power.
JERRY JONES HUBRIS WATCH, DAY 1344

Emmitt Smith, the NFL's all-time leading rusher, is now an Arizona Cardinal. That would make him the 2003 equivalent of Jerry Rice (defecting to his team's most mortal enemy), but nobody considers the Cardinals dangerous.

Has nobody learned from the saga of the Minnesota Vikings and Gary Anderson (the NFL's all-time leading scorer)? When somebody achieves total statistical dominance, you don't just cut them even if they are past their prime, as Gary Anderson is (he can't kick off into the end zone) and as, lamentably, Emmitt Smith also is. The elemental spirits of football always exact terrible revenge on teams that drop their aging heroes. Well, except for the 49ers and Joe Montana.

Anyway, along these lines, my Chiefs just signed their 42-year-old placekicker, Morten Andersen, to a new four-year contract. That, my friends, is how you treat a valued veteran. Andersen says he wants to play until he's 50, and he'll probably make it. Somewhere in Kansas City, Jan Stenerud is smiling.
THREE LITTLE WORDS

No, not those. I'm talking "church soup supper." Tonight at Zion, before I inflicted an incoherent sermon about 1 John 3:11-24 on my unsuspecting people, they served us homemade chili (I still can't get over the fact that they put elbow macaroni in the chili here), vegetable beef soup, and sandwiches, both ham salad and egg salad. The dessert table grows every week, too.

Your humble correspondent is a soup ecumenist, consuming a bowl of each type, but I don't do egg salad.
AT LEAST WE'RE TALKING

From the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod website comes an account of increased dialogue between the LC-MS and ELCA on matters dividing the two churches. Personally, I never thought I'd see the day. Maybe things have changed a little in St. Louis?

I'm not optimistic about the prospects for significant pan-Lutheran fellowship in my lifetime. The dividing lines are too deep, and there are too many people with too many scars, on both sides. As one of the few ELCA pastors who's had the privilege of serving a former AELC church (i.e., one of the churches which left LC-MS in the 70s), I can tell you that there's still a lot of hurt feelings out there.
WHERE THE WOMEN ARE STRONG . . .

There's a nice little interview with Garrison Keillor on the Christian Century website right now in which he discusses what the folks in Lake Wobegon are reading these days. Sometimes I think he takes the whole Lake Wobegon thing too far, but maybe that because it hits uncomfortably close to home sometimes.

Still, sometimes I swear Larry Woiwode must be looking over my shoulder . . .
AT LEAST A GRAIN OF SALT, MAYBE THE WHOLE SHAKER

Well, somebody is reporting that chemical weapons have been found in Iraq, although I think it's at least a little bit possible that Pat Robertson has an axe to grind in the Middle East.

Then again, there's also this report from the Edinburgh News, so maybe there just might be something to this after all. Time will tell--I don't know much right now, but one thing I'm pretty sure of is that there's still lots of stories as yet untold in this war.
IT'S WEDNESDAY
Expect minimal updates until this evening. I do have busy days at work, you know!
MORE ECCLESICRAT CRITICISM

William F. Buckley comments on the divide between pew and pulpit during the war.

Tuesday, March 25, 2003

ROCK AND ROLL TUBA CUE

TV commercials for the FX network's new show Lucky feature a great obscurity from the era of rock and roll horn bands, Blood Sweat and Tears' Go Down Gambling. You really should hear the original recording. It's easily the most rocking thing BS&T ever recorded, and it features the only tuba solo I've ever heard in a rock song.

By the way, though it's infrequently updated, there's a great site about songs used in commercials here. And since they won't tell you, the song from the Saturn "Old Age Ahead" commercial ("Well, I'm a modern guy, I don't care much for the go-go or the retro . . .") is We've Been Had by the Walkmen from their album Everyone Who Pretended To Like Me Is Gone. That's for the benefit of the none of you who care, of course.
OLD GUARD MEDIA SLIPPING AWAY?

Connie Chung has left CNN. This probably means something, but what?

I saw her show a couple times and, for entertainment purposes, she was no competition for Bill O'Reilly. Love him or hate him, the Factor is never boring.
A SIX-POINT PLAN THAT WOULDN'T WORK

TomPaine.com offers this account of a typically short-sighted church-leader approach to peaceful regime change in Iraq. Its underpinning is the belief that indicting Saddam Hussein in an international war-crimes tribunal would be sufficient to incite revolution from within. It also calls for strengthening the arms embargo, using the UN to increase pressure on the regime, and a few other things which have been tried in the balance and found wanting. Just another dispatch from the "stop or I'll say stop again" school of church politics. They understand that the threat of military force was crucial in getting weapons inspections rolling again, but fail to see that threats need to have a clear chance of being carried out in real time.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: If the UN were parents, their kids would be the ones breaking into your car and defiantly shrieking, "I didn't do nothin'!" when they got caught. Why ecclesicrats continue to be infatuated with the UN is beyond me. Hasn't the irrelevance of the World Council of Churches taught them anything?
ICE OUT, BABY

Aerial reconnaisance (i.e., standing on the deck and looking across the lake) has revealed a large, and I mean large, patch of open water on Sinissippi. This is the first official sign that it's time to enjoy that blessed week-and-a-half inbetween the doorknobs blasting across the lake on snowmobiles, and the airheads blasting across the lake on jet skis.

Paula called from Florida tonight, having spent the day at Sea World. She and Hailee are both worn out. Paula is vowing never to return to Orlando again. In other words, my sinister plan is working! She now thinks a great vacation means sleeping in, reading in a comfy chair and eating when you want to eat.

And some people wonder why I married her.

I got a major megacraving for a pork chop and mashed potatoes after a visit to one of the most evil sites on the Net, Roadfood.com. I read their review of the Machine Shed, an attempt to create a Midwestern version of Cracker Barrel at 133% of the cost. In other words, I'm not a real fan, but (a) their pan-fried chicken, when they have it, is absolutely worth the $11 it costs, and (b) the picture of the pork chop on Roadfood's site would induce cravings in anybody who hasn't gone vegan.

So naturally, for dinner, I had a forlorn frozen chicken patty and Lipton's faux risotto-in-a-bag. Cap that off with a caffeine-free Diet Pepsi, and it's fair to wonder whether it would have been less punishment to be sent to bed without supper.
JA, SJUR, YA BETCHA
UFOs. Norwegians. Insert your own punchline here.
MY COUNTRY, RIGHT OR WRONG?

Here's a thought-provoking article from Peter C. Meilaender in last month's First Things, a journal of religion and public life. The article, "Christians as Patriots," explores whether Christians can rightly love their country, or if our kingdom really is "not of this world." Meilaender says yes, through an analogy of parenting as filtered through Rodgers and Hammerstein.
THIS SPUD'S FOR YOU

Here's an article from the Minneapolis Star Tribune about a suspicious package found in the Minneapolis Post Office. Turns out somebody mailed a slice of rotten potato to a US Representative, with a note attached reading, "Have a French fry."

This is obviously a political statement of some sort, but doggone if I know what it is . . .
TOP HEAVY

Fred Barnes has a good article on the Weekly Standard website about the growing divide between Episcopalian national leadership and the people in the pews. It centers somewhat around the war, but descibes Barnes' general frustration with highly liberal leadership in the Episcopal Church. I'm sure lots of people in mainline Protestant churches might commiserate, though.


Maybe some Catholics, too, once this article from the Washington Post gets a little more publicity. I find it amazing that a Polish pope with direct memories of Nazi Germany would jump over to the "war is never the answer" side of the fence. What would he have said to the Warsaw Jews in 1939? "Of course you're in a tough spot, but it's not worth going to war over, since people could die"?

Pardon me for a hawkish moment, but stuff like this disturbs me. I wonder if Marvin Gaye realized what he was unleashing on the world when he recorded What's Going On: one of the most vacuous, content-free slogans the world has ever known. Don't tell me "war is not the answer" unless you've demonstrated that you fully understood the question first.
NAUSEA-RAMA

Forget last week's "puke-in" in San Francisco: the most revolting media reports I've read in a while come from this article in the St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press. Unless the thought of a sugared-lard sandwich sounds good to you. Go read about the disgusting cuisine of people's childhood. I'm pretty sure it's well after lunchtime for most of my readers . . .
HAWKERDAMMERUNG

My beloved Hawkeyes got knocked out of the Not Important Tournament last night. So there will be no Steve Alford-Bob Knight showdown this week, which would have been a more interesting story than anything happening in the Big Dance. Oh, and by the way, Butler's not really a Cinderella if everybody and their dog's color guy was saying they had the potential to go deep in this tournament. And when will the NCAA seed Gonzaga properly, anyway?
PICTURE PERFECT MORNING

Once again, the sun has risen in a cloudless sky, the air is clean and damp, and spring is sniffing the ground, wondering if it's safe to come out. Sinissippi looks like still water this morning, not like a mile and a half of ice. It's still frozen, but now I'm really convinced that ice-out is near.

I miss my wife and kid, still four days away from returning. Thank you, God, for giving me nice weather to dull the pain. If it was even just a little warmer, I'd be out on the deck with my coffee, watching the world wake up. But an open window is an acceptable substitute, I guess.
HOLDING MY NOSE AND PRAYING FOR PEACE

I'm certainly not going to turn this into a war blog--goodness knows, there's enough of those out there--but it's impossible to ignore what's going on in the world right now.

I reluctantly support this war, since I cannot for the life of me figure out what good will be accomplished by leaving the Iraqi regime in power. However, once we've accomplished this regime change, we'd better get started writing apologies to the few dozen other nations whose brutal, oppressive regimes we've left in power, including the one that's just 90 miles from our border. I do not like the geopolitical implications of this war.

I'm not smart enough to know if our military strategy is sound. But I am smart enough to know that there haven't exactly been heavy casualities so far. However, to hear some of the world media discuss it, we're stuck in another Vietnam-ish quagmire.

That's asinine. In Vietnam we didn't have air dominance like we do here. That is such a tremendous force advantage.

Personally, I blame the 1970s. Actually, I blame the 70s for almost everything that's wrong with contemporary life, but the 70s saw the changeover from news reporting to activist journalism. Every reporter out there knows the shortest path to a Pulitzer involves taking down a president. Not that the press isn't free, and not that it shouldn't be, but so much negative reporting is almost cartoonishly over-aggressive.

Anyway, of course I want this war to end quickly, with as few casualities on both side as possible. But what a vague hope that is! Who doesn't want that? Like I told my congregation last Wednesday, pray for our troops, pray for our president, and, since Jesus said we should pray for our enemies, pray for Saddam Hussein, since he's the only one who can determine how bloody this war will be, and most of all, pray for the civilians of Iraq, who didn't ask for this war, did nothing to deserve it, but have to suffer with it anyway. If God's taking sides in this war, I'm pretty sure he's on their side.

Monday, March 24, 2003

Once again, the Oscars came, the Oscars went, and I hadn't seen any of the major nominees. In fact, I hadn't even seen any of the minor nominees. OK, the only movie I saw in the theater this year was Punch Drunk Love. And actually, I rather enjoyed it. Adam Sandler played his usual harmlessly-violent sociopath, but at least this time they kept the fart jokes to a minimum and actually bothered to write a story. It was all arty and stuff. It's worth a rental, IMO. But, as usual, it's not for the kids.

Anyway, the Oscars. Like I said earlier, I bombed out big-time in my Oscar pool, though I would like to state for the record that I nailed the technical categories and documentaries. That somewhat mollifies the fact that I only got 1 of the "big five" categories.

When Michael Moore won Best Documentary for Bowling For Columbine, I knew exactly what his acceptance speech was going to be, and I was right. I don't agree with Moore's politics much, but it's hard not to admire his courage. Not like his incendiary comments will harm his career; I think everybody in Hollywood knows Michael Moore's point of view by now. I couldn't help but wonder how many of the audience would have more visibly agreed with him if the cameras weren't running, though.

We saw A Beautiful Mind last year, and it was one of the better pictures I've seen in a while. But that was last year, a much better year for Hollywood.
Springtime has hit Wisconsin. The ice on Lake Sinissippi has gone all wavy and bubbly-looking, and I suspect it'll go ice-free before too many days go by. Sunday was an absolutely gorgeous day. Paula had some pictures to pick up in Menomonee Falls, so after church I thought I'd go get them. By way of Mequon and Brown Deer, of course. It was only 67 degrees but felt ten degrees warmer, and everybody was out enjoying it--bikes, rollerblades, walkers, everybody.

I suppose I shouldn't be too surprised, what with Harley-Davidson headquarters being only 30 miles from my house, but I am beginning to wonder if I'm the only fat guy in Wisconsin without a motorcycle. I'm certainly the only one without a motorcycle, snowmobile, or pickup truck. Sigh. Sometimes I feel so un-masculine. Then I pick up a pair of drumsticks and smoke the tar out of one of my snare drums--that always seems to do the trick.

Today was cooler and cloudier, but still nice. I walked for about 30 minutes (since that's all the time I had) and it felt good to stretch out the muscles after too long of a layoff. Since restaurant booths are getting tighter than they used to be, I think maybe I'd better get used that experience.

Yeah, yeah, and I'd better quit spending so much time in restaurant booths. Tell me something I don't know, OK?
Get it while it's fresh: an excellent article from Paul Berman in this week's New York Times magazine.

The article deals with the Islamic philsopher Sayyib Qutb, his criticism of how Christianity went wrong, and how his writings may have laid the underpinnings for Islamic terrorism.

You will need to register to read the article, but fear not; the Times won't spam you unless you give them permission to.

The article is at once enlightening and chilling. I find myself wondering how many Christians, while resisting his criticism of Christianity, might find themselves in agreement about the impropriety of separating the sacred and the secular. I'm seriously thinking about doing a lecture at my church on the topic of Islam, Chirstianity, and freedom. After I blew my cover last week by publicly admitting I'm a Libertarian, I guess I'm emboldened to do almost anything.

Read the article. It's well worth your time, even if you hate the NYT.

Special thanks to Mike Masin for providing the link.
My NCAA brackets have been poked full of more holes than a Jello cake (thank you very little, Wake Forest and Illinois), I finished next-to-last in my Oscar pool, my wife and kid are off in Florida until the end of the week, and thus I find myself starting a blog. Again. I'm sure only about 8 million blogs have been created in the last 72 hours, now that we're all riveted to CNN again, just like 12 years ago.

Gentle reader, if you're reading this, you already know me, because how else would you have found this address? Anyway, let me introduce myself: I'm a 31-year-old living in rural southeastern Wisconsin, Dodge County to be specific. I'm married with a 5-year-old stepdaughter, I'm a pastor serving a Lutheran church, and I hope you'll understand if I'm dodgier about details beyond that. Suffice it to say, I'm legit, I am who I say I am, and I'm here to ruminate and speculate on life in general, and life around here in particular. Stop back often; I've got lots to say, when I find time to say it.